The Heart Leaf Philodendron

Many years ago, when I moved into my first apartment, my father gave me a plant. He actually took leaves from a plant that hung in his living room and gave me a portion of it to re-plant at my new home.

What I soon discovered was this was no ordinary plant.

My dad had quite the green thumb—he could make anything grow. The original plant was a Heart Leaf Philodendron, a common house plant. It’s been used as an indoor plant since Victorian times, and it has the ability to grow very large.

He helped me re-plant my new leaves into a small planter, and just like that, I had an instant decoration for my home.

At first it was fun to watch the leaves begin to sprout and expand. Then, the plant exploded. The vines grew long, and I wrapped them around the tiny planter. I knew I would have to re-pot it soon.

My plant traveled with me as I moved over the years. No matter where I put it—living room, kitchen, dining room—it continued to grow. All I needed to do was water the soil, spray the leaves and make sure I gave it a little bit of love.

Then my father died.

He had a heart attack on a Friday morning, and for the first time in my life I came face-to-face with death. It hurt.

The plant now took on a special meaning. This was a connection with my dad, and I wanted it close to me. I wanted to see it, so I could think of him and what he meant to me. So I took it to work and put it in my office.

But, as much as I wanted it around me, I found myself getting preoccupied with projects, paperwork and life…and the plant was neglected.

After returning from a long weekend, I found it drooping, sagging, and brown. A lot of the leaves were dead.

How could I have done this? How could I have treated my dad’s plant this way?

I cut back the dead vines, and grabbed a bottle of water. I had to return to the beginning–a small plant ready to grow again.

And it slowly came back to life, resurrected.

And then it hit me. My dad was a man of great faith. He taught me how to love and honor God. He taught me how to embrace the Holy Spirit’s constant love. He taught me to how to walk with Jesus, through good times and bad.

He was still teaching me, even after he was gone.

Sometimes we all need to stop and cut back the bad vines. We need to water our soil and spray our leaves. We need learn once again how to give a little bit of love.

And we need to believe in the power of the resurrection.

This Heart Leaf Philodendron was no ordinary plant.

 

Dan Herda is an editor of theROCK

 

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We Have a Mission

A Message from Kurt Peot

The greatest news ever received: the Messiah, as predicted by scripture and the prophets, has come in Jesus Christ, fulfilling all that was written about Him, and He has risen from the dead! He has set us free from our sin and returned us to being a part of the Trinity through Him!

After his resurrection, Christ was intent on proving to His disciples that His glorified body, while different in appearance and no longer constrained by space and time, is still physical, having flesh and bones. He encouraged them to touch Him, see Him and eat with Him. Certainly, no ghost can eat. A ghost would have been easier for the disciples to wrap their minds around than a physically resurrected Christ.

How is it for you?

Jesus suffered and died so that He could rescue us from our sin. It’s easy for me to think of Him as divine, and so of course, He could do and endure all that He did. But, as a man, it seems harder, darn near impossible. Yet, He did, because He loves us and loves the Father.

What does He ask of us in return?

We started on Ash Wednesday, “repent and believe in the Gospel.” Now, He asks us to go and preach the Good News, in His name, to all nations. The Good News that He suffered, died and rose from the dead so that we could spend eternity with Him and the Father.

We have a mission! We have been called! We have been sent! Where will we go today and to whom will we proclaim the Good News?

Jesus Christ is Risen, Alleluia!

 

Kurt Peot is a member of St. Dominic Catholic Parish. He recently was accepted into the introductory phase of diaconate formation and discernment.