The Light that Awaits Us at Easter

A Message from Sarah Daszczuk

We’ve now finished the third week of Lent. Historically, this is the point where I start slacking off in my Lenten resolutions. Like this dark winter, Lent seems to go on endlessly, and I just grow tired of it.

But, I am reminded of the Light that awaits us at Easter. 

In 2 Chr 36:14-23, we get a recap of Israel’s relationship with God throughout the Old Testament. The people whom God had chosen to be His own, “added infidelity to infidelity,” and God responded by sending prophets often, “for he had compassion on his people and his dwelling place.” But, Israel would not repent and could not be faithful to Him, and so God allowed their enemies to take over their land, to burn Jerusalem, and to take the Israelites into exile.

Sound familiar? Have you had seasons of your life where you felt in exile from God? Have you ever allowed sin to overtake your life to the extent that you can’t hear the voice of God? I have. Like Adam and like the Israelites, I too have told God that I know better than He and that I trust myself more than I trust Him.

But, here is the Good News of Easter: God never gave up on Adam, or Israel, or me, or you. He gave Adam hope, He brought Israel out of exile, and He gave literally everything He had, to win us back.

So, in these dark last weeks of Lent, let us persevere, remembering that Light has come into the world, “For God so loved the world that He gave His only Son…that the world might be saved through Him.” -John 3:16-17


Sarah Daszczuk is the Director of Youth & Young Adult Ministry & Evangelization at St. Dominic Catholic Parish


Children and Lent

A Message from Stacey Irvine

Every year, I have the privilege of speaking with Lifelong Faith Formation students in K3 through 6th grade about the season of Lent. It was refreshing to hear what many students already knew about Lent and what it means for them in their own lives. Their responses included helping to set the table, taking laundry out of the dryer, reading a book to a sibling, not fighting with a sibling as much, and praying more together as a family. My heart was still.

This made the next conversation about the Pillars of Lent; prayer, fasting, and almsgiving easy.

Some may wonder, do children even know what these mean?

The answer is, yes!

Even more incredible is that these children find ways to be able to give alms to help support  our Lenten Outreach Project. They work their mom and dad to earn some money or skip the weekly trip out to dinner or a special treat and eat at home instead. These kids get it. They want to help others.

Please pray that the Holy Spirit continues to guide our children in prayer, serving others, and being charitable.


Stacey Irvine is the Director of Children’s Ministry for St. Dominic Catholic Parish

To Be Transfigured

A Message from Paul Burzynski

Have you ever had a life altering experience? A car accident? A fire? Maybe consider something less intense; the birth of a child? Buying your first home?

All of these experiences, without question, would change your life. One drives more cautiously after an accident, and surely, life is never the same after the birth of a child—all life altering experiences. We all have them. Most of them are completely unexpected.

 When Peter, James and John, journey up Mt. Tabor with Christ, that experience would change them forever. Imagine being in their place when suddenly, you see Moses, Elijah, and your friend (Jesus) transformed before your eyes, and you don’t understand it. How can you not be changed by that!

I’ve always wondered why this gospel reading is proclaimed on the Second Sunday of Lent. It certainly is an intriguing and exciting story, but why the transfiguration account every year?

Maybe our personal Lenten challenges have made us grow weary already. For some, maybe not. Perhaps the reason why the Church gives us this reading today is to help and encourage us in our journey up our own Lenten Mt. Tabor; to remind us early on, that through our self-discipline, our prayer, our fasting, and our alms-giving, we too can become transformed.

Let us pray that through the Pillars of Lent, we might seek Christ, know Christ, and become Christ, that at the end of our journey, we too might hear the words, “This is my beloved.”


Paul Burzynski is the Director of Music & Liturgy for St. Dominic Catholic Parish